Alumni Outcomes

 

(left to right) David Harrington, Quan Zou, Tapan Nayak at an alumni event.

 

Statistics Department graduates go on to work in government, finance, executive leadership, academia, consulting and even homicide investigation. They have taught at Ivy League universities, launched companies and won awards from the American Statistical Association for their contributions.

 


Recent Undergraduate Alumni Employers

 

  • Adaptive Biotechnologies
  • American Institutes for Research
  • AmeriCorps National Civilian Community Corps
  • Bank of China
  • Bates White Economic Consulting
  • Columbia University
  • Deloitte
  • Duke University
  • Georgetown University

 

  • Health Services Advocacy Group
  • International Food Policy Research Institute
  • Optimus Consulting
  • Rice University
  • University of Chicago
  • University of Hong Kong
  • U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation
  • Wells Fargo

 

 


"In my work as a defense analyst, and also as I pursued my master's degree, the knowledge I gained as a statistics minor has been continuously valuable to me."

Sarah Amundson

BA ’01


 

Recent Graduate Alumni Employers

 

  • Amazon
  • Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve
  • Capital One
  • DuPont Stine-Haskell Research Center
  • Ernst & Young
  • Facebook
  • Fannie Mae
  • Gallup
  • InterMedia Survey Institute
  • JP Morgan Chase
  • Kaiser Permanente
  • Merkle

 

  • National Cancer Institute
  • Penn State University
  • Public Opinion Strategies
  • S&P Global Ratings
  • United Overseas Bank
  • University of Colorado, Denver
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
  • U.S. Department of the Treasury
  • The Washington Post
  • Wells Fargo
  • World Financial Group
  • World Wildlife Fund

 

 


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Alumni Spotlight

graphic of code and magnifying glass

Can a Computer Code Catch Killers?

September 11, 2019
As a statistics student at GW, Thomas Hargrove threw himself into computer modeling, developing intricate algorithms. Today, he is using those same skills to track and identify serial killers. In 2010 alone, his algorithm determined that 15 unsolved strangulations in Gary, Indiana, were likely committed by the same person.